Rock Paper Scissors – Corporate Eco Activism

Rock Paper Scissors – Corporate Eco Activism

Rock-Paper-Scissors

Plastic is bad for the environment, and so supermarket chains, that are solely responsible for incredible food waste and over packaging decided to introduce ‘bags for life.’ Unfortunately, they were also made from plastic, and they didn’t last a lifetime. So now we’ve gone full circle, back in the day when everything was made from paper, supermarket bags, greaseproof sheets at the butchers, and takeaways wrapped in newspaper instead of polystyrene cartons.

Pulp Fiction

Pulp Fiction

So, what’s the problem? Well, wood pulp needs trees and farming them ruins the topsoil. The energy it takes to process wood pulp is as excessive as almost any other industrial production method. Like paper, manufacturing pulp requires vast amounts of sulphur compounds and nitrogen oxides, which can also cause air pollution. What’s more, chlorinated and organic compounds are flushed into the rivers and seas—not forgetting the millions of tons of solid waste and sludge to contend with every year. The construction of mills, which rarely rely on sustainable energy, and carbon monoxide created by employees travelling long distances to work, are merely the icing on the cake. There’s almost nothing environmental about paper except that it can degrade. The problem isn’t with plastic bags but the whole retail sector. It’s centralised and corporatised and it habitually distributes produce from one side of the world to the other.

The Long Con

The Long Con

I wonder how long it will take people to realise that they’re being conned. Yes, pollution is real, but the government’s only incentive are new income streams and more taxes, in other words, cash flow. There is, however, another purpose to their agenda. The politicisation of the environment is a mind game. The elites are toying with us, and ever since the lockdown, more and more people have realised that they’re being duped.

Up in Smoke

Up In Smoke

Much of the environmental movement is little more than social programming, testing the patience of the public with ever more ludicrous governmental guidelines. Even I continue to recycle, despite my local council’s policy of incinerating recycled materials. Rather than capturing heat, they systematically burn waste and pollute the local environment. After all, like most diktats from high above, the system is designed to cause maximum inconvenience and minimum ecological gain. I’ve read how particular city councils are even mulling over the idea of chopping down more trees to reduce carbon dioxide, which is a perfectly natural gas, and one that has been part of the natural cycle since the dawn of Earth.

Corporate Compassion

Corporate Compassion

Many charities, including several environmental organisations, spend less than half of their donations on their cause. A good slice of the money funds advertising, travel expenses, rent and utilities, employee salaries (including some exceptionally well-imbursed directors), and glittering events to schmooze their major donors. Usually, you get what you paid for, but when it comes to charities, be careful with your choice.

Free Pass

Free Pass
There’s a get-out clause for underdeveloped countries, and as far as China goes, it’s the powerhouse of global manufacturing, and few dare criticise its impact on the environment. Yet, for the rest of us, it’s just another social burden, a well-meaning but ultimately pointless exercise. What’s needed is a revolution in technological advancement. In reality, all of our useless consumer gadgets and devices lag decades behind the curve. It’s just a matter of greed and patent law, and monopolistic practices of major corporations that’s getting in the way.

Power Trip

Power Trip

Those with money and power have a tendency to bully the masses, cajoling them at almost every turn. It doesn’t matter what the problem is, the elites stagger technological solutions in order to maximise the profit. Since time immemorial the rich and powerful have done everything they can to suppress political revolution and maintain their hold over the great unwashed masses. One of their most potent weapons is guilt, which is why the last millennia was riddled with holy wars. To this day the tactic still persists in places like the Middle East, but when the West lost its faith in religion, the elites experimented with new strategies.

Psychological Warfare

Psychological Warfare

The Cold War was all about paranoia, drilling down into the human psyche with horrific visions of nuclear armageddon. For over thirty years, the shadow elite pushed their agenda, but in the end, they realised the public had grown immune to the idea, and so they launched a new campaign of psychological warfare. This time it would be the environment, and like most just causes many honest and well-meaning protestors jumped on board. After a while, the news spread that the world was dying from Global Warming. When that didn’t pan out the manufactured curse was rebranded as Climate Change, but despite the obvious rise of weather modification on a near industrial scale, the idea took hold in the public psyche.

How to Save the World

Save The World
So here we are doing our best to make a difference, but individually and collectively, our actions hardly constitute a drop in the ocean. For most waste is created by the corporations and tried and tested toxic manufacturing processes. The only way we can truly improve the environment is through community action, banding together and punishing the corporates and hitting them where it hurts – in their pockets.

Unfortunately, it’s far too late to make a stand now. The vast majority of the human race cannot imagine a world without technology, global air travel, fast food, factory farming, power generation, mass communication. There are so many conveniences in modern life that have made this world almost uninhabitable, which is why we must think laterally and individualise our contribution to the environment, analysing what we do and reducing waste in our own unique ways.

Here’s what I’ve done to make a difference without realising it:

1. I don’t drive and have no car. I ride a bike or use public transport.

2. I have rarely ever travelled by air.

3. I buy what I need and not what I want.

4. I have no children.

5. When possible I always buy second-hand.

6. If I don’t need something, I give it to charity.

7. I do not follow fashion and wear clothes until they fall apart.

8. I have insulated as much of my house as possible to keep down bills and not waste energy.

9. Rather than buy new I repair what I can – household items, appliances, clothes, furniture and much more.

10. I own one phone, it is ten years old, and it’s all I need to communicate on the go.

D.I.Y Revolution

DIY Revolution

Don’t fall for the hype. Government and corporate waste is at an all-time high. It’s a case of one rule for the elite and another for the rest, and it’s always been that way. Take everything you see, hear, and read in the mainstream media with a pinch of salt. The hierarchy, the autocracy, the shadow elite are not our friends, and they are blindly leading us down a path to destruction.

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